31 December 2012

Lina Cavalieri

Around 1900, Italian soprano Lina Cavalieri (1874 - 1944) was considered the most beautiful woman on earth and one of the queens of the Belle Époque. In the 1910's, she became a popular film star in Italian, French and American films.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., no. 1188. Sent by mail in 1906. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., no. 1188. Sent by mail in 1905. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard, no. 1188. Sent by mail in 1906. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Hour-glass Figure
Lina Cavalieri was born Natalina Cavalieri into poverty in a slum in Viterbo, Italy, in 1875. She first sold flowers on the streets of Rome, then packed copies of one of the local newspapers. At the age of thirteen she made her first appearances in a café chantant in Rome's Piazza Navona, where, after her performances, she took round a hat for donations. She lost her parents at the age of fifteen and became a ward of the state, sent to live in a Roman Catholic orphanage. Unhappy under the strict raising of the nuns, she ran from the orphanage with a theatre group. Blessed with a good singing voice and stunning good looks, she made a career as a vaudeville singer. At the Folies Bergère in Paris, she came to rank with Cécile Sorel and Caroline Otero as one of the queens of the Belle Époque, and the management quickly renewed her contact. In 1897 she triumphed at London's Empire Theatre, and later also in St. Petersburg.In 1900, she made her opera debut in Lisbon, Portugal, as Nedda in Pagliacci. That same year she married her first husband, the Russian Prince Alexandre Bariatinsky. In 1904, she sang at the Opéra de Monte-Carlo. A year later, Cavalieri starred opposite Enrico Caruso in Fedora at the Sarah Bernhardt Theatre in Paris. From there, she and Caruso took the opera to New York City, debuting with it at the Metropolitan Opera on 5 December 1906. According to IMDb, Cavalieri became so carried away with Caruso that she once kissed him passionately on stage. Cavalieri remained with the Metropolitan Opera for the next two seasons, performing again with Caruso in 1907, in Puccini's Manon Lescaut. She became one of the most photographed stars of her time, and was frequently referred to as the 'world's most beautiful woman'. Cavalieri was famous for her hour-glass figure, visible in photographs and portraits by Cesare Tallone , Giovanni Boldini and Reutlinger. During the 1909–1910 season she sang with Oscar Hammerstein's Manhattan Opera Company. Her first marriage long over, she had a whirlwind romance and marriage with Robert Winthrop Chanler, a member of New York's prominent Astor family. However, this marriage lasted only a very short time

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., no. 180/1. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., 50th series, no. 4. Sent by mail in 1908. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., no. 188/9. Sent by mail in 1906. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by S.I.P., 50th series [?]. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris. Signed 30 January 1906.

Presumed Lost
Back in Europe, Lina Cavalieri married French tenor Lucien Muratore in 1913. She withdrew from the stage and started a career in the cinema. In Greta Britain she appeared in Manon Lescaut (1914, Herbert Hall Winslow) opposite her husband. It was the first feature-length (four reels) adaptation of Abbe Prevosts tragic novel Manon Lescaut. From 1915 on, she appeared in Italy in the films La sposa della morte/The Bride of Death (1915) and La rosa di Granada/The Rose of Granada (1916), both directed by Emilio Ghione. She returned to the United States, where she appeared in the melodrama The Eternal Tempress (1917, Emile Chautard), Love's Conquest (1918, Edward José), A Woman of Impulse (1918, Edward José), and The Two Brides (1919, Edward José) for Famous Players-Lasky. In these films Cavalieri was already in her forties. Hans J. Wollstein comments at AllMovie: "Unlike (opera diva Geraldine) Farrar, Cavalieri proved rather too theatrical for what really was an intimate medium." Most of her films are presumed lost now, but her recorded voice remains. La Cavalieri's discography is slim though. In 1910, for Columbia, she recorded famous arias, as well as the song, Maria, Marì! In 1917, for Pathé, the soprano recorded Le rêve passé (The Dream Passed), with Lucien Muratore. Married for the fourth time to Paolo d’Arvanni, Cavalieri returned to live with her husband in Italy. During the Second World War, she worked as a volunteer nurse. In 1944, she was killed in an Allied bombing raid which destroyed her home near Florence. Lina Cavalieri was immortalised in an Italian biopic dedicated to her life: La donna più bella del mondo/The Most Beautiful Woman in the World (1955) starring Gina Lollobrigida. In 2004, a book was published, Lina Cavalieri: The Life of Opera’s Greatest Beauty, 1874–1944, written by Paul Fryer and Olga Usova.

Lina Cavalieri
Italian postcard and photo by Alterocca, Terni, no. 1750. Virgilio Alterocca (1853 - 1910) founded the first company for illustrated and photographic cards in Italy. He already founded a typographic company in 1877 working for newspapers and producing posters, but around 1896, thanks to modernising techniques in phototypography from Germany and Switzerland, he was able to make a booming business with photographic cards.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by RPH, Paris, no. 5001. Photo: Reutlinger, Paris.

Lina Cavalieri
French postcard by F.C. & Cie, no. 21. Photo: A. Bert. Signed 22-3-1912.

Lina Cavalieri by Cesare Tallone
Ritratto di Lina Cavallieri, 1905. Painting by Cesare Tallone. Courtesy Gigliola Tallone.


Hear Lina sing the song Maria, Marì! (1910). Source: peppopb (YouTube).

Sources: Michael E. Henstock (Opera Quarterly), Hans J. Wollstein (AllMovie), Wikipedia, Terniweb.it and IMDb.

30 December 2012

Carola Höhn

German actress Carola Höhn (1910 - 2005) had a 60 years lasting film career. She began as the elegant star of many Ufa productions and later became the acclaimed Grande Dame of the German post-war cinema.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Film-Foto-Verlag, no. G 174, ca. 1941-1944. Photo: Ciolfi, Rome.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. A 3956/2, 1941-1944. Photo: Haenchen.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. 9941/1, 1935-1936. Photo: Hämmerer / Ufa.

Sissi
Carola Höhn was born as Karoline Minna Höhn in Geestemünde (now Bremerhaven), Germany, in 1910. At the end of the 1920’s she went to Berlin, where she received acting lessons from Julia Serda and Hans Junkermann. In 1933 she made her stage debut at the Berlin Schlosstheater. Five years earlier she already had had her first contacts with the film business when she played minor parts in silent films like Die Wochenendbraut/The Weekend Bride (1928, Georg Jacoby), Aus dem Tagebuch eines Junggesellen/From the Diary of a Bachelor (1928, Erich Schönfelder) starring Reinhold Schünzel, and the Russian-German divorce drama Zhivoy trup/The Living Corpse (1929, Fyodor Otsep). Her film career really took off with the romance Ferien vom Ich/Holiday Drom Myself (1934, Hans Deppe). She became a popular Ufa star with roles in films like Einmal eine grosse Dame sein/Once a Great Lady (1934, Gerhard Lamprecht), Charleys Tante/Charley's Aunt (1934, Robert A. Stemmle), and Der alte und der junge König/The Old and the Young King (1935, Hans Steinhoff). In Königswalzer/The Royal Waltz (1935, Herbert Maisch) she played Sissi, the iconic Empress Elisabeth of Austria. Next she was seen in the operetta Der Bettelstudent/The Beggar Student (1936, Georg Jacoby) and the Zarah Leander melodrama Zu neuen Ufern/To New Shores (1937, Detlev Sierck a.k.a. Douglas Sirk). Opposite Heinz Rühmann she starred in the comedy Hurra, ich bin Papa!/Hurrah! I am a Papa (1939, Kurt Hoffmann). During wartime, she continued her film career in light entertainment like Die lustigen Vagabunden/The Funny Vagrants (1940, Jürgen von Alten) with Johannes Heesters, Sonntagskinder/Sunday Children (1941, Jürgen von Alten), Mamma (1941, Guido Brignone) with Beniamino Gigli, and Warum lügst Du, Elisabeth?/Why Do You Lie, Elisabeth? (1944, Fritz Kirchhoff). In 1941 she married a major of the Luftwaffe, Arved Krüger. He was shot during action above Malta in 1942. Their son Arved-Michael was born later that year.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Film-Foto-Verlag, no. A 3880/1, 1941-1944. Photo: Star-Foto-Atelier / Tobis.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Film-Foto-Verlag, no. A 3880/2, 1941-1944. Photo: Star-Foto-Atelier / Tobis.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. A 3370/2, 1941-1944. Photo: K.L. Haenchen.

True Trouper
After the war Carola Höhn first gained a foothold at the theater and gave guest performances in Berlin, Vienna, Munich and Bremen. She also dubbed films and lent her voice to stars like Katherine Hepburn, Ava Gardner and Danielle Darrieux. Her first post-war film was the drama Du bist nicht allein/You're Not Alone (1949, Paul Verhoeven). Another popular film was Toxi (1952, Robert A. Stemmle). She was seen in successful Heimatfilms like Heideschulmeister Uwe Karsten/Eternal Love (1954, Hans Deppe) as the mother of Barbara Rütting, and Johannisnacht/Midsummer Night (1956, Harald Reinl). During the following demise of the popular German cinema the elegant Grande Dame played on as a true trouper in brainless and increasingly tasteless comedies, including a remake of the transvestite comedy Viktor und Viktoria/Viktor and Viktoria (1957, Karl Anton), the Rex Gildo vehicle Appartementzauber/Apartment Enchantment (1963, Helmuth M. Backhaus), Pepe, der Paukerschreck/Pepe: His Teacher's Fright (1969, Harald Reinl) and the softcore sexfilm Graf Porno und die liebesdurstigen Töchter/Count Porn and His Love Thirsty Daughters (1969, Günther Hendel). Her activities dropped off in the 1970's. She played parts in the popular TV-krimi Derrick (1977-1980) and in the Hollywood production Nightcrossing (1981, Delbert Mann). The comedy Schloss Königswald/Castle Königswald (1988, Peter Schamoni) was a tribute to her and colleague stars of the Ufa like Marianne Hoppe, Camilla Horn and Marika Rökk. Together, the actresses were awarded the Bavarian Film Prize for Best Actress. In 1990, Carola Höhn was also honored with the Filmband in Gold for her contributions to the German film over the years, and in 1999 she received the Bundesverdienstkreuz am Bande (Germany's Cross of Merit). Beside her acting jobs, she ran a fashion store and wrote articles for Film und Frau magazine. Carola Höhn died in 2005 at the age of 95 years in a nursing home in Grünwald near Munich. Her second marriage was to Gerd Lange from 1966 till his death in 1991.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Film-Foto-Verlag, no. G 174, 1941-1944. Photo: Ciolfi, Rome.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Film-Foto-Verlag, no. A 3735/1, 1941-1944. Photo: Ciolfi.

Carola Höhn
German postcard by Ross Verlag. Photo: Tobis / Lindner.

Sources: Thomas Staedeli (Cyranos), Stephanie D'heil (Steffi-line), Wikipedia (German) and IMDb.

29 December 2012

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)

Thunderbirds creator Gerry Anderson passed away on 26 December 2012. His puppet adventures thrilled millions of children across the world.

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)
Thunderbirds, Jeff Tracy. Dutch postcard by Vita Nova, Schiedam, no. B/10/41. Photo: A.P. Films, London / Coliseum, London, 1965. Caption: Startplaats Thunderbird 1 met Jeff Tracy (Launch bay Thunderbird 1, with Jeff Tracy).

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)
Thunderbird 3, Alan. Dutch postcard by Vita Nova, Schiedam, no. B/10/41. Sent by mail in 1967. Photo: A.P. Films, London / Coliseum, London, 1965. Caption: Thunderbird 3 met piloot Alan Tracy (Thunderbird 3, with pilot Alan Tracy).

Strings Attached
British producer and writer Gerry Anderson(1929 - 2012) was responsible for some of the most instantly recognisable characters and series ever made for television. Never mind that most of his creations came with strings attached (quite literally), shows like Thunderbirds (1965-1966; 2004), Stingray (1964-1965; ) and Captain Scarlet (1967-1968; 2005) remain timeless, delighting and inspiring generation upon generation of children. Anderson once received a thank you letter from a scientist working for Nasa whose imagination was fired as a child watching one of his shows.

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)
Thunderbird 2, Virgil. Dutch postcard by Vita Nova, Schiedam, no. B/10/41. Sent by mail in 1966. Photo: A.P. Films, London / Coliseum, London, 1965. Caption: Thunderbird 2 met piloot Virgil Tracy (Thunderbird 2, with pilot Virgil Tracy).

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)
Thunderbird 5, John. Dutch postcard by Vita Nova, Schiedam, no. B/10/41. Sent by mail in 1967. Photo: A.P. Films, London / Coliseum, London.

Daring Rescues
Thunderbirds tells about the adventures of millionaire Jeff Tracey’s sons – Scott, Virgil, Alan, Gordon and John (all named after American astronauts) and their daring rescues of people in peril. The TV series was an instant phenomenon. Sold to 66 countries the show earned Anderson the Royal Television Society silver medal for outstanding artistic achievement. As for its enduring cult appeal, winning over successive generations of fans, Anderson was clear: “Thunderbirds gives kids what they want – death and destruction – and yet the underlying story is about saving life, not destroying it.” In 1966 a feature film, Thunderbirds Are GO (1966, David Lane) reached the cinemas. It was followed up by Thunderbirds 6 (1968, David Lane). Anderson and his wife Sylvia Anderson were the writers and producers of these films.

Gerry Anderson (1929 - 2012)
Captain Scarlet. Dutch postcard by Gebr. Spanjersberg N.V., Rotterdam. Photo: Century 21 Ltd, 1968.

Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons - Captain Black and the Spectrum
Captain Black and the Spectrum. Dutch postcard by Gebr. Spanjersberg N.V., Rotterdam. Sent by mail in 1976. Photo: Century 21Ltd., 1968. Publicity picture for Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons. Pictured here are Captain Black and the Spectrum.

Source: Robert Sellers (The Independent) and IMDb.

27 December 2012

Suzy Vernon

Suzy Vernon (1901 - 1997) was a popular leading lady in French and German films of the 1920’s and 1930’s. The French film star worked with some of her era's best directors.

Suzy Vernon
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4442/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Manuel Frères, Paris.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by E.D.U.G., no. 1028. Photo: Paramount. Publicity still for Miche (1932).

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Europe, no. 1105. Photo: Paramount.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by E.D.U.G., no. 109. Photo: Paramount.

Napoleon
Suzy Vernon was born as Appollinie Paris in Nice, France, in 1901. She made her film debut in La Conquête des Gaules/The Conquest of the Gauls (1922, Marcel Jonnet, Jan B. Dyl) based on the book Commentaries on the Gallic War by Gaius Julius Caesar. Famous Belgian director Jacques Feyder gave her a part in his film Das Bildnis/L’image (1923, Jacques Feyder). She also appeared as the mother of Jean Forest in Feyder’s realistic mountain drama Visages d'enfants/Children’s Faces (1925, Jacques Feyder). In 1988, the Belgian Film Archive released a restored print of this classic film. Feyder had a considerable influence on European filmmaking. His films were noteworthy for their introduction of Poetic Realism, a style which eventually became a cinematic movement. Suzy Vernon next appeared in Napoléon (1927, Abel Gance), a silent, historical epic of 235 minutes. It was the chef d'oeuvre of legendary French filmmaker Abel Gance, who intended it as the first installment in a multipart film study of the French military hero. Napoléon was largely designed as a showcase for the revolutionary Polyvision process, which utilized multiple images for dramatic effect. In Germany, Vernon appeared with Nils Asther in Gauner in Frack/Crooks in Tails (1927, Manfred Noa) and next to Willy Fritsch in Der Letzte Walzer/The Last Waltz (1927, Arthur Robison), based on the same-named operetta by Oscar Strauss - minus the musical score. She costarred with celebrated Russian actor Ivan Mozzhukhin in the melodrama Der Präsident/The President (1928, Gennaro Righelli), and she costarred with the Italian diva Francesca Bertini in Tu M'Appartiens/You Belong to Me (1929, Maurice Gleize). Her last silent production was the German detective film Das grüne Monokel/The Green Monocle (1929, Rudolf Meinert) with Ralph Cancy (sometimes written as Clancy) as detective Stuart Webbs.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Editions Cinémagazine, no. 54. Photo: Studio G.L. Manuel Frères.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Editions Cinémagazine, no. 905. Photo: Studio G.L. Manuel Frères.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Editions Cinémagazine, no. 47.

Alternative Language Versions in Hollywood
After the sound film arrived, Suzy Vernon went to the USA. There she appeared in some French language versions of Hollywood productions. For First National she played in Le masque d'Hollywood/Woman Hunter (1930, Clarence G. Badger, John (Jean) Daumery), an alternative language version of Show Girl in Hollywood (1930). She also played the female lead opposite Daniel Mendaille in Contre-Enquete/Cross Investigation (1930, Jean (John) Daumery). This was one of three different versions of the George Kibbe Turner gangster novel Those Who Dance, each filmed in a different language. The English version starred Monte Blue and Lila Lee; and the German version, Der Tanz Geht Weiter top-billed Wilhelm (William) Dieterle and Lissi Arna. Vernon also appeared in the English language white slavery melodrama Girls for Sale! (1930, Bud Pollard) with Vivian Gibson. Another early talkie was Le Chanteur de Seville (1930, Yvan Noé, Ramon Novarro), the French-language version of the Technicolor MGM musical drama Call of the Flesh. Silent Superstar Ramon Novarro repeated his role as Juan, a young aspiring singer who is advised that he will never achieve greatness until his heart is broken. Though the original Call of the Flesh was directed by Charles J. Brabin, the French version was helmed by Novarro, who, according to Hal Erickson at AllMovie “did a commendable job”.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Editions Chantal, Paris, no. 36.

Suzy Vernon
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 3291/1, 1928-1929. Photo: Ufa.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by A.N., Paris, no. 614. Photo: Paramount.

International Shooting Locations
For her next films, Suzy Vernon traveled to other international locations. La Femme de Mes Reves/My Dream Woman (1931, Jean Bertin) with Roland Toutain was filmed in Berlin. It was also simultaneously filmed in a German-language version, Eine Nacht im Grandhotel (1931). Miraculously, both versions came in for a combined cost of only $100,000. Filmed in North Africa was the Foreign Legion melodrama Le Sergent X (1932, Vladimir Strizhevsky), in which she again costarred with Ivan Mozzhukhin. The romantic comedy Miche (1932, Jean de Marguenat) was purportedly set in Switzerland, but filmed at Paramount's French studios in Joinville. She starred for director Jacques Tourneur in the romantic comedy Pour être aimé/For Being Loved (1933) with Pierre Richard-Willm. One of her last major films was the anecdotal seriocomedy Un homme en or/A Man and His Wife (1934, Jean Dréville) with Harry Baur. In 1940 after some incidental smaller roles in the late 1930’s she retired from the film business. She was married to Ralph de Leon. After their divorce, she married a Lebanese doctor. In 1958 she followed her husband to Lebanon, and nobody, not even her family got any news from her. Suzy Vernon seemed to have disappeared, but it is known that she died in 1997 in Moulins, France.

Suzy Vernon
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 1914/1, 1927-1928. Photo: Alex Binder, Berlin.

Suzy Vernon
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 7428/1, 1932-1933. Photo: Studio Piaz, Paris.

Suzy Vernon
French postcard by Europe, no. 62. Photo: Paramount.

Sources: Céline Colassin (CinéArtistes) (French), Hal Erickson (AllMovie), Wikipedia, AllMovie and IMDb.

26 December 2012

Hedda Vernon

German actress, writer and producer Hedda Vernon (1886-1925) appeared in more than 60 films of the early silent period. During the 1910s, she was such a popular film star that she got her own Hedda-Vernon-serial.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film Sterne series, no. 232/1. Photo: Becker & Maass / Eiko-Film.

Hedda Vernon (retouched)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, Berlin, no. 2001/12, 1919-1924. Photo: Becker & Maass / Eiko Film.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Photochemie, Berlin, no. K. 104. Photo: Eiko-Film.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 360/2, 1919-1924. Photo: Becker & Maass Phot.

Child Parts
Hedda Vernon (sometimes credited as Hedda Vernon-Moest) was born in 1886. In 1912 she made her first film appearances in silent shorts for the Deutsche Bioscop GmbH in Berlin. That year she appeared in Die Rote Jule/Red Jule (1912, Emil Albes), Der Kampf um das Erbe/The Conflict about the Heritage (1912, Max Obal), and Die Papierspur/The Paper Trail (1912, Emil Albes). The following years she played in Vitascope productions directed by Harry Piel, like Menschen und Masken 1 & 2/People and Masks 1 and 2 (1913, Harry Piel), Die Millionenmine/The Millions Mine (1914, Harry Piel) and Die braune Bestie/The Brown Beast (1914, Harry Piel). But she worked most often with her husband, actor-director Hubert Moest. They made a series of Eiko-productions, including Zofenstreichen/Abigail Paintings (1915, Hubert Moest), Maria Niemand und Ihre Zwölf Väter/Maria Niemand and Her Twelf Fathers (1915, Hubert Moest) with Theodor Loos, Das Bild der Ahnfrau/The Picture of the Ancestress (1916, Hubert Moest) with Rudolf Forster and Harry Liedtke, Noemi die blonde Judin/Noemi the Blonde Jew (1917, Hubert Moest), Der Peitschenhieb/The Whiplash (1918, Hubert Moest), and Taumel/Rapture (1919, Hubert Moest) with Alfred Abel and Paul Hartmann. In Zofia (1915, Hubert Moest) she impersonated a fifteen year old girl although she was 29 at the time. Such ‘child parts’ were normal for actresses in the 1910's and 1920's.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film Sterne series, no. 68/5. Photo: Eiko-Film.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film Sterne Series, no. 136/5. Photo: Becker & Maass, Berlin.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film-Sterne Series, no. 138/6. Photo Becker & Maass, Berlin / Eiko Film.

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Photochemie, Berlin, no. K 1340. Photo: Alex Binder.

Harry Piel Series
Hedda Vernon became so popular that she got her own serial which was financed by her production company Vernon-Produktion. She produced herself in Selbstgerichtet oder Die gelbe Fratze/Self Defence or The Yellow Grimace (1914, Hubert Moest) and Hedda Vernon’s Bühnensketch/Hedda Vernon's Stage Sketch (1916, Hubert Moest). She also worked with director Richard Oswald on Der Eiserne Kreuz/The Iron Cross (1914) with Hanni Weisse, Der Tod des andern/Other's Death (1919) with Alwin Neuss, and Manolescus Memoiren/The Memories of Manolescu (1920) starring Conrad Veidt. During the 1920's, the interest in Hedda Vernon flagged. New stars became more in demand. To her few films in the 1920's belong Der Verächter des Todes/The Death Defier (1920, Harry Piel), the Harry Piel series Der Reiter ohne Kopf/The Horseman Without a Head (1921, Harry Piel) and Die Sonne von St. Moritz/The Sun of St. Moritz (1923, Friedrich Weissenberg, Hubert Moest). Her last film was Zwischen zwei Frauen/Between Two Women (1925, Hubert Moest) opposite Reinhold Schünzel. She supposedly died that same year. Hedda Vernon was married with Hubert Moest from 1913 till 1920.

Hedda Vernon in Noemi, die blonde Jüdin.
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film-Sterne series, no. 517/10. Photo: Eiko Film. Publicity still of Hedda Vernon in Noemi, die blonde Jüdin (1917, Hubert Moest).

Hedda Vernon in Mouschy
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film-Sterne series, no. 518/1. Photo: Eiko Film. Hedda Vernon in Mouschy (1918, Hubert Moest).

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film Sterne Series, no. 560/2. Photo: Eiko Film. Publicity still for Wo ein Wille, ist ein Weg (1918, Hubert Moest) with in the back right Ernst Hofmann.

Hedda Vernon in Wo ein Wille, ist ein Weg
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film-Sterne series, no. 560/8. Photo: Eiko Film. Hedda Vernon in Wo ein Wille, ist ein Weg (1918, Hubert Moest).

Hedda Vernon
German postcard by Rotophot in the Film-Sterne series, no. 561/2. Photo: Eiko Film. Hedda Vernon in Puppchen/Dolly (1918, Hubert Moest).

Sources: Thomas Staedeli (Cyranos), Filmportal.de, Wikipedia (German) and IMDb.