19 September 2018

Gustavo Serena

Italian silent film actor and director Gustavo Serena (1882-1970) is now best remembered as diva Francesca Bertini's co-star, but he did much more than that.

Gustavo Serena
Italian postcard by Ed. A. Traldi, Milano, no. 36. Photo: Pinto, Roma.

Gustavo Serena
Italian postcard by the magazine Film (Naples/Rome). Photo: Caesar Film.

Gustavo Serena
Italian postcard by Vettori, Bologna, no. 451bis.

Francesca Bertini


Gustavo Serena was born into a wealthy Neapolitan aristocratic family in 1881 or 1882. He left his military career for the stage.

In 1909, he switched to the cinema. He made his film debut in the Cines production Bianca Cappello/White Chapel (1909), a period piece by Mario Caserini.

From 1910 on, Serena acted in the films by the Italian Pathé film unit Film d'Arte Italiana. Here he was already paired with his future partner Francesca Bertini in 6 period pieces such as La Contessa di Challant e Don Pedro de Cordova/The Countess de Challant (Gerolamo Lo Savio, 1911), Romeo e Giulietta/Romeo and Juliet (Ugo Falena, 1912) and Lucrezia Borgia (Gerolamo Lo Savio, 1912) with Bertini in the title role of Lucrezia Borgia.

Then, Serena and Bertini both moved to the Cines company, though they did not play together there. At Cines, Serena also started to direct films.

In 1913, he had a major breakthrough as Petronius in the epic Cines film Quo vadis? (Enrico Guazzoni, 1913). The film became a worldwide success and was arguably the first blockbuster in the history of cinema, with 5,000 extras, lavish sets, and a running time of two hours, setting the standard for 'superspectacles' for decades to come.

In 1913 Serena also acted in productions by Roma Film. In 1914, he moved on to the Turinese company Pasquali, where he played in films by Umberto Paradisi and opposite actors as Maria Jacobini and Anna Petersen. In 1915, he left Pasquali and returned to Rome to work at Caesar Film, where he became not only an important actor but also a major director.

Gustavo Serena and Amleto Novelli in Quo vadis?
Italian postcard by Film Cines, Roma, no. 6572. Gustavo Serena as Petronius Arbiter and Amleto Novelli as Marcus Vinicius in Enrico Guazzoni's epic film Quo vadis? (produced 1912, released 1913), based on the famous homonymous novel by Henryk Sienkiewicz.

Quo vadis? (Enrico Guazzoni, Cines 1913)
Italian postcard for the classic epic Quo vadis? (Enrico Guazzoni, 1913). Caption: The devotion of the slave Eunice (Amelia Cattaneo) to Petronius (Gustavo Serena).

Francesca Bertini & Gustavo Serena in La signora delle camelie
Italian postcard by Vettori. Photo: still from La signora dalle camelie/The Lady of the Camellias (Gustavo Serena, 1915), with Francesca Bertini. The film was based on Alexandre Dumas fils' classic stage play La dame aux camélias, which in its turn was the basis for Giuseppe Verdi's classic opera La traviata.

Golden Couple


At Caesar, Gustavo Serena directed various films with Francesca Bertini. In the meantime, she had become an adored film star, a 'diva'.

The first of the films of Serena with Bertini was a classic precursor of neorealism, Assunta Spina (Gustavo Serena, 1915), based on a Neapolitan stage play by Salvatore Di Giacomo.

Wikipedia: "One of the aims of creating this film was to reveal the subtle expressive power of filmmaking, compared to theatrical plays. Francesca Bertini' fully displayed her talent for the first time, setting a new standard for acting on the silver screen. Her performance is generally rated as extraordinary, and in polar opposition to the work of writer and dramatist Gabriele D'Annunzio who was very popular at the time."

Today, Serena's direction of the film is discussed; some historians maintain that Bertini directed a part of or even the whole film.

At Caesar, Serena played the lead opposite Bertini in 11 feature films. Of these, he both directed and played in Assunta Spina (1915), Diana l'affascinatrice/Diana, the Adventuress (1915), Ivonne la bella danzatrice/Yvonne, the Beautiful Dancer (1915), Il capestro degli Asburgo/The Rope of Habsburg (1915), and La signora dalle camelie/The Lady of the Camelias (1915).

In 1916, Giuseppe De Liguoro took over the direction of the Bertini-Serena films, including Odette (1916) and Fedora (1916). The following year, Serena again both directed and acted in Andreina (1917). After that, Alfredo De Antoni took over  and he directed the golden couple Bertini-Serena in such successes as Il processo Clémenceau/The Clemenceau Affair (1917), Tosca (1918) and Frou-Frou (1918).

When Bertini starred in seven films based on the 7 mortal sins, Serena played opposite her in L'ira/Anger (Edoardo Bencivenga, 1918) and L'avarizia/Greed (Gustavo Serena, 1919). These were their last collaborations. Then Gustavo Serena was replaced as Francesca Bertini's co-star by actors such as Livio Pavanelli, Sandro Salvini and Mario Parpagnoli.

Gustavo Serena
Spanish postcard by Gurgui, no. 11. Gustavo Serena in Tosca (1918).

Tosca (1918)
Spanish postcard by Amattler Marca Luna, series 5, no. 10. Photo: Caesar Film. Publicity still for Tosca (Alfredo De Antoni, 1918), starring Francesca Bertini as Floria Tosca and Gustavo Serena as Mario Cavaradossi. After having killed Angelotti, Sacrpia (Alfredo De Antoni) arrests Caravadossi, to Tosca's despair.

Tosca (1918)
Spanish postcard by Amattler Marca Luna, series 5, no. 18. Photo: Caesar Film. Publicity still for Tosca (Alfredo De Antoni, 1918), starring Francesca Bertini as Floria Tosca and Gustavo Serena as Mario Cavaradossi. The execution of Cavaradossi on the roof of the Castel Sant' Angelo, with St Peter's cupola in the distance. Tosca discovers Scarpia's (Alfredo De Antoni) betrayal. She herself has just stabbed Scarpia to death. When Scarpia's men try to arrest her, she jumps of the roof with the words: "O Scarpia, davanti a Dio!"

Fascist Propaganda Piece


While not making films with Bertini anymore, Gustavo Serena continued to direct films at Caesar, with actors from its regular troupe, such as Carlo and Olga Benetti.

Among these films were A San Francisco (1915), based on another play by Di Giacomo; Parigi misteriosa/Mysterious Paris (1917), based on Eugene Sue's novel Les mystères de Paris, and Fernanda (1917), starring Leda Gys. He often played in these films too. Serena continued to direct films up to 1923, often with the actresses Anna Fougez, Tilde Kassay and Nella Serravezza.

Until 1926, Serena regularly acted in films too, including the German 2-part period piece Sterbende Völker/Dying People (Robert Reinert, 1922), shot in Italy; the fascist propaganda piece Il grido dell'aquila/The Shout of the Eagle (Mario Volpe, 1923); the Ronald Colman-Lilian Gish melodrama The White Sister (Henry King, 1923), an American production shot in Italy, and Fra Diavolo (Roberto Roberti, Mario Gargiulo, 1925) in which Serena played the title role.

When sound film came to Italy, Serena made a handful films, based on regional theater, such as Zappatore (1930), in which he played the lead himself. He quitted directing after that, but continued to play minor roles in Italian sound films in the late 1930s.

During the war years, Serena was production manager for a few films. Again from the late 1940s and all through the 1950s, he acted in several films, though in small parts. His last roles were even uncredited: bit parts in I soliti ignoti/Big Deal on Madonna Street (Mario Monicelli, 1959) and Don Camillo monsignore ma non troppo/Don Camillo: Monsignor (Carmine Gallone, 1961).

Gustavo Serena's parabole ended in 1970, when he died in Rome. He was 88. Serena had appeared in 107 films and had directed 33 films.

Soava Gallone and Gustavo Serena in La via del peccato
Italian postcard. Photo: Soava Gallone and Gustavo Serena in La via del peccato/The Way of Sin (Amleto Palermi, 1925).

Soava Gallone and Gustavo Serena in La via del peccato (1925)
Italian postcard. Photo: Soava Gallone and Gustavo Serena in La via del peccato/The Way of Sin (Amleto Palermi, 1925).

Sources: Aldo Bernardini/Jean A. Gili (Le cinéma italien 1905-1945), Gianfranco Mingozzi/Vittorio Martinelli (Francesca Bertini), Wikipedia and IMDb.

18 September 2018

Anton Walbrook

Dark and handsome Anton Walbrook or Adolf Wohlbrück (1896-1967) was a distinguished Austrian actor who starred in early German sound films as Walzerkrieg (1933) and Viktor und Viktoria (1933). After the rise of Adolph Hitler, he settled in Great Britain where he appeared in such film classics as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) and The Red Shoes (1948). He also played the ringmaster in La Ronde (1950).

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
Vintage collectors card.

Adolf Wohlbrück in Michel Strogoff (1936)
French postcard by Les Productions J.N. Ermolieff / Tobis. Photo publicity still for Michel Strogoff (Jacques de Baroncelli, Richard Eichberg, 1936), based on the novel by Jules Verne.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
German postcard by Ross Verlag/Das Programm von Heute. Photo: Slavia - Tobis Europa. Publicity still for Port Arthur (Nicolas Farkas, 1936).

Gender-bending


Anton Walbrook was born as Adolf Anton Wilhelm Wohlbrück in Vienna, Austria-Hungary (now Austria) in 1896. He was the son of Adolf Wohlbrück II and his Austrian wife Gisela Rosa Cohn. He descended from ten generations of actors though his father broke with tradition and had become a circus clown.

Young Adolf studied with the famous stage director Max Reinhardt, who signed him to a five-year contract at the Deutsches Theater. In 1915 he had made his film debut as a circus director in the German silent film Marionetten/Marionettes (Richard Löwenbein, 1915).

During the mid-1920s, he starred in several films of the Stuart Webbs detective series, but the young actor was not noted in them. After the advent of sound film, this changed. He had a leading part opposite Anna Sten in the German language version of the drama Salto Mortale/Trapeze (Ewald André Dupont, 1931) and starred opposite Heinz Rühmann in the comedy Der Stolz der 3. Kompanie/The Pride of the Third Company (Fred Sauer, 1932).

Opposite lovely Anny Ondra, he appeared in the musical comedy Baby (Carl Lamac, 1932). The dashing actor then graced a number of romantic films. He played Johann Strauss in the UFA operetta Walzerkrieg/The Battle of the Waltzes (Ludwig Berger, 1933) opposite Renate Müller.

Again with Müller, he appeared in the gender-bending UFA-comedy Viktor und Viktoria/Viktor and Viktoria (Reinhold Schünzel, 1933), which later served as the inspiration and basis for the Hollywood comedy Victor Victoria (Blake Edwards, 1982) starring Julie Andrews. He also appeared in the French version, Georges et Georgette (Roger Le Bon, Reinhold Schünzel, 1934), with Meg Lemonnier replacing Müller.

A huge hit was Maskerade/Masquerade in Vienna (Willi Forst, 1934) with Paula Wessely. Thensellek reviews at IMDb: “A delightful movie, full of atmosphere of the post World War I Vienna. (...) The story is told quickly, the scenes full of wit and very discreet erotic hints. The leads are cast with two of Austria finest (...). If you want to dive deeply into Austrian culture and understand the country's roots, then watch this wonderful movie.”

Another interesting role was that of the student Balduin in the fantasy film Der Student von Prag/The Student of Prague (Arthur Robison, 1935), a new and different version of the silent classic of 1913 starring Paul Wegener.

In 1936 Wohlbrück went to Hollywood to reshoot dialogue for the RKO production The Soldier and the Lady (George Nicholls, 1937) the English language version of the Jules Verne adaptation Der Kurier des Zaren/The Czar's Courier (Richard Eichberg, 1936) in which he played Michael Strogoff, a role he had also played impeccably in the French and German versions. In Hollywood he changed his name from Adolf Wohlbrück into Anton Walbrook.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
German postcard by Ross Verlag. no. 9205/2, 1935-1936. Photo: Bender & Jacobi, Berlin.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 9205/3, 1935-1936. Photo: Bender & Jacobi, Berlin.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 9379/2, 1935-1936. Photo: Genja Jonas, Dresden.

Adolf Wohlbrück
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 9839/1, 1935-1936. Photo: Bender.

Half-Jewish and Homosexual


Anton Walbrook was classified under the Nuremberg Laws as half-Jewish. He was also a homosexual and a political opponent of the Nazi regime. So instead of returning to Austria, he decided to settle in England.

There he continued working as a film actor making a speciality of playing continental Europeans with his trademark moustache. Meanwhile he supported Jewish actors and their families in Germany from London.

Producer-director Herbert Wilcox cast him as Prince Albert opposite Anna Neagle as Queen Victoria in the black-and-white costume film Victoria the Great (Herbert Wilcox, 1937) and Walbrook also appeared in the colour sequel, Sixty Glorious Years (Herbert Wilcox, 1938). He was also on the London stage from 1939 in Design for Living.

In the original film version of the stage thriller Gaslight (Thorold Dickenson, 1940), he was the sadistic husband of Diana Wynyard, roles played by Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman in the later Hollywood remake. In the romantic melodrama Dangerous Moonlight (Brian Desmond Hurst, 1941), Walbrook was a Polish pianist torn over whether to return home.

Walbrook played a gentle pacifist in the wartime propaganda film 49th Parallel (Michael Powell, 1941), made by the team of director Michael Powell and writer-producer Emeric Pressburger. In their satire The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Michael Powell, 1943) he played the role of the dashing, intense ‘good German’ officer Theo Kretschmar-Schuldorff.

In their greatest hit, the romantic melodrama The Red Shoes (Michael Powell, 1948), he was the tyrannical but charismatic impresario Lermontov who poises ballerina Victoria Page (Moira Shearer) to superstardom. Lotti St writes at IMDb: “Anton Walbrook is the star of this film, playing a Diaghilev type character and absolutely dominates any scene he is in. He is not bombastic in a showy, hammy way. It is a more silent but deadly charismatic performance. It is a pity he did not receive an award for it. He is stern, uncompromising, cold and passionate and absolutely deadly. He is a gentleman tough guy.”

One of his most unusual films is the brilliant The Queen of Spades (Thorold Dickenson, 1949), an odd, Gothic thriller based on the Alexander Pushkin short story in which Walbrook co-starred with Edith Evans. In 1947, Walbrook had become a British citizen.

Luise Ullrich and Adolf Wohlbrück in Regine (1935)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 8937/1, 1933-1934. Photo: Fanal-Europa. Publicity still for Regine (Erich Waschneck, 1935) with Luise Ullrich.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück) in Zigeunerbaron (1935)
German postcard by Ross Verlag. no. 9128/1, 1935-1936. Photo: Ufa. Publicity still for Zigeunerbaron/The Gypsy Baron (Karl Hartl, 1935).

Adolf Wohlbrück in Port Arthur (1936)
German postcard by Ross Verlag. no. 9840/1, 1935-1936. Photo: Tobis-Europa / Stania. Publicity still for Port Arthur (Nicolas Farkas, 1936).

Adolf Wohlbrück in Port Arthur (1936)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 9840/2, 1935-1936. Photo: Tobis-Europa / Stania. Publicity still for Port Arthur (Nicolas Farkas, 1936).

Chilling Arrogance and Tragic Pathos


During the 1950s, Anton Walbrook appeared in British productions as well as in continental films. In the French classic La Ronde/The round of love (Max Ophüls, 1950), he was the gently ironic ringmaster who guides us through a series of affairs in Vienna, around 1900. Another French production was L'affaire Maurizius/On Trial (Julien Duvivier, 1954) starring Daniel Gélin.

In Great Britain, he reunited with Powell and Pressburger for their musical Oh... Rosalinda!! (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, 1955) featuring Ludmilla Tchérina. It was an updated version of Johann Strauss's 1874 operetta Die Fledermaus (The Bat) and Walbrook played the role of Dr. Falke a.k.a. the Bat.

For Ophüls, he then played king Ludwig I of Bavaria in Lola Montès (Max Ophüls, 1955) starring Martine Carol. He also appeared in Saint Joan (Otto Preminger, 1957) with Jean Seberg as Joan of Arc. His last English-speaking film was I Accuse! (José Ferrer, 1958), in which he played again a stiff and stern military officer.

He then retired from films but continued to perform on stage. He also appeared in some German television films, including a new version of the classic Hollywood mystery Laura (Franz Josef Wild, 1962) with Hildegard Knef, and Robert und Elisabeth (Eberhard Schröder, 1966) with Sabine Sinjen.

In March 1967, Anton Walbrook collapsed during a performance of Noel Coward’s play A Song at Twilight at Munich’s Kleine Komödie. He was just honoured with the notable award the Filmband in Gold for his longtime and important contributions to the German cinema.

Later that year he died of the consequences of a heart attack in Garatshausen, Germany. His ashes were interred in the churchyard of St. John's Church in London, as he had wished in his testament. Tim Bergfelder notes in the Encyclopedia of British Cinema that “Anton Walbrook's screen acting combined melancholic irony and old-worldly charm, chilling arrogance and tragic pathos.”

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
British postcard in the Picturegoer series, London no. 1153. Photo: Radio.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
British postcard in the Picturegoer Series, London, no. W. 432. Photo: J. Arthur Rank Organization Ltd.

Anton Walbrook (Adolf Wohlbrück)
Italian postcard by B.F.F. Edit. no. 2273. Photo: Tobis / E.N.I.C.


Scene from Life of Colonel Blimp (1943). Source: Mutikonka (YouTube).

Sources: Tim Bergfelder (Encyclopedia of British Cinema), Gary Brumburgh (IMDb), Filmportal.de, Wikipedia (English and German), and IMDb.

17 September 2018

Elisabeth Müller

Swiss actress Elisabeth Müller (1926-2006) was a popular star of the German Cinema in the 1950s. Her popularity brought her to Hollywood where she appeared in a few films.

Elisabeth Müller in Moselfahrt aus Liebeskümmer (1953)
German postcard by Kunst und Bild, Berlin, no. A 1107. Photo: Joe Niczky / Ariston / Columbia. Publicity still for Moselfahrt aus Liebeskümmer/Heartbroken on the Moselle (Kurt Hoffmann, 1953).

Elisabeth Müller in Moselfahrt aus Liebeskümmer (1953)
East-German postcard by VEB Progress Film-Vertrieb, Berlin, no. 238. Photo: Ariston-Film. Publicity still for Moselfahrt aus Liebeskümmer/Heartbroken on the Moselle (Kurt Hoffmann, 1953).

Elisabeth Müller and Will Quadflieg in Moselfahrt aus Liebeskummer (1953)
East-German postcard by Progress, Berlin, no. 242, 1956. Photo: Ariston-Film. Publicity still for Moselfahrt aus Liebeskümmer/Heartbroken on the Moselle (Kurt Hoffmann, 1953) with Will Quadflieg.

Elisabeth Müller and Ivan Desny in André und Ursula (1955)
German postcard by Rüdel-Verlag, Hamburg-Bergedorf, no. 1364. Photo: Rotary / Deutsche London / Schlawe. Publicity still for André und Ursula/Andre and Ursula (Werner Jacobs, 1955) with Ivan Desny.

Elisabeth Müller and Robert Taylor in The Power and the Prize (1956)
German postcard by Kolibri-Verlag G.m.b.H., Minden/Westf, no. 2819. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Publicity still for The Power and the Prize (Henry Koster, 1956) with Robert Taylor.

A Darling of the Cinema Public


Elisabeth Müller was born in Basel, Switzerland in 1926.

She studied acting with her aunt, stage actress Ellen Widmann, and between 1944 and 1946 she followed classes at the Schauspielschule Zürich. The next years she worked in many Swiss and German theatre companies.

As Lisabet Müller, she made her film debut in Paragraph 51 – Seelenarzt Dr. Laduner/Paragraph 51 - Headshrinker Dr. Laduner (Leopold Lindtberg, 1947). Another popular Swiss film with her was the crime film Matto regiert/Madness Rules (Leopold Lindtberg, 1947).

In Germany, she played in the comedy Der Tag vor der Hochzeit/The Day before the Wedding (Rolf Thiele, 1952) opposite Paul Dahlke and  Joachim Brennecke.

Her first big hit, the sentimental romance Moselfahrt aus Liebeskummer/Heartbroken on the Moselle
(Kurt Hoffmann, 1953) with Will Quadflieg, made her a darling of the cinema public in the 1950s.

Next she worked twice with the legendary director G.W. Pabst, for the crime drama Das Bekenntnis der Ina Kahr/Afraid to Love (Georg Wilhelm Pabst, 1954) with Curd Jürgens, and for the drama Rosen für Bettina/Ballerina (Georg Wilhelm Pabst, 1956) opposite Willy Birgel.

Elisabeth Müller
German postcard by Kunst und Bild, Berlin, no. A 1218. Photo: NF / Lilo / Ariston GmbH. Publicity still for Morgengrauen/Dawn (Viktor Tourjansky, 1954).

Elisabeth Müller in Rosen für Bettina (1955)
German postcard by WS-Druck, Wanne-Eickel. Photo: Carlton / NF / Michaelis. Publicity still for Rosen für Bettina/Ballerina (G.W. Pabst, 1955).

Elisabeth Müller
German postcard by Universum-Film Aktiengesellschaft, Berlin-Tempelhof, no. FK 3488. Retail price: 25 Pfg. Photo: Maack / Arca-NF-Film. Publicity still for Geliebte Corinna/Beloved Corinna (Eduard von Borsody, 1956).

Elisabeth Müller in Geliebte Corinna (1956)
German postcard by Universum-Film Aktiengesellschaft, Berlin-Tempelhof, no. FK 3489. Retail price: 25 Pfg. Photo: Arthur Grimm / Arca-NF-Film. Publicity still for Geliebte Corinna/Beloved Corinna (Eduard von Borsody, 1956).

Elisabeth Müller in Skandal in Ischi (1957)
German postcard by Kunst und Bild, Berlin-Charlottenburg, no. T 871. Photo: Vienna / Schorcht / Hämmerer. Publicity still for Skandal in Ischi/Scandal in Bad Ischl (Rolf Thiele, 1957).

Hollywood


Her popularity brought Elisabeth Müller to Hollywood where she appeared in The Power and the Prize (Henry Koster, 1956), costarring with Robert Taylor, and the war drama The Angry Hills (Robert Aldrich, 1957-1959) with Robert Mitchum and based on a novel by Leon Uris. Neither film was a commercial success.

She returned to Europe where she appeared in such films as Taxichauffeur Bänz/Taxi Driver Bänz (Werner Düggelin, Hermann Haller, 1957) with Maximilian Schell in one of his first roles, and El Hakim (Rolf Thiele, 1957) with O.W. Fischer.

Her biggest TV success was the Mini-series Am grünen Strand der Spree/At the Green Beach of the River Spree (Fritz Umgelter, 1960) with Peter Pasetti, based on a novel by Hans Scholz.

Since the early 1960s, she worked mainly in the theatre, but in the 1960s and in the 1980s she also occasionally was seen in TV films like Ottiliens Tollheiten/Ottilien's Follies (Ludwig Berger, 1964) and Die Tote im Schlosspark/The Body in Schlosspark (Jürgen Goslar, 1984).

At the age of 80, Elisabeth Müller passed away in 2006 in Sempach, Switzerland. She was married to director and director of photography Kurt Grigoleit.

Elisabeth Müller and Peter van Eyck in Dr. Crippen lebt (1958)
East-German postcard by VEB Progress Film-Vertrieb, Berlin, no. 1534, 1961. Retail price: 0,20 DM. Photo: publicity still for Dr. Crippen lebt/Doctor Crippen lives (Erich Engels, 1958) with Peter van Eyck.

Peter van Eyck, Elisabeth Müller
East-German postcard by VEB Progress Film-Vertrieb, Berlin, no. 1535, 1961. Retail price: 0,20 DM. Photo: publicity still for Dr. Crippen lebt/Doctor Crippen lives (Erich Engels, 1958) with Peter van Eyck.

Elisabeth Müller
German postcard by WS-Druck, Wanne-Eickel, no. F 41. Photo: Klaus Collignon.

Elisabeth Müller
German postcard by WS-Druck, Wanne-Eickel, no. F 114. Photo: Klaus Collignon.

Elisabeth Müller
Belgian postcard by Cox, no. 12.

Sources: Wikipedia (German) and IMDb.