26 August 2019

New acquisitions at G.D.I.: a gift from Kathinka Dittrich, Part 2

Yesterday, EFSP posted on an old postcard album which Egbert Barten of the Geoffrey Donaldson Institute (G.D.I.) received from German film historian and author Kathinka Dittrich. The album contains dozens of German and Dutch postcards which were collected by a Dutch girl around 1930. The album includes several hand coloured film star postcards by Ross Verlag and one by Iris-Verlag which we had never seen before. Today, we share a selection with you.

Mary Pickford in Little Annie Rooney (1925)
Austrian postcard by Iris-Verlag, no. 907. Photo: United Artists / Projectograph-Film. Mary Pickford in Little Annie Rooney (William Beaudine, 1925). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Mary Pickford (1892-1972) was a legendary silent film actress and was known as 'America’s sweetheart.' She was a founder of United Artists and helped establish the Academy.

Brigitte Helm
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4015/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Sandau, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

German actress Brigitte Helm (1908-1996) is still famous for her dual role as Maria and her double the evil Maria, the 'Maschinenmensch', in the silent SF classic Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927). After Metropolis she made a string of over 30 films in which she almost always had the starring role. She easily made the transition to sound films, before she abruptly retired in 1935.

Esther Ralston in The Wheel of Life (1929)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4329/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Paramount. Esther Ralston in The Wheel of Life (Victor Schertzinger, 1929). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Projected as wholesome but fun-loving, Maine-born leading lady Esther Ralston (1902-1994) enjoyed a prime silent age career. She appeared in close to 100 films over a nearly 30-year period. At her peak, she was packaged and publicised as 'The American Venus' by Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. after appearing as a dazzling beauty queen in the film The American Venus (1926). A decade later, the blonde beauty's career, however, had tapered off.

Anna May Wong
German postcard by Ross Verlag, Berlin, no. 4338/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Gudenberg, Berlin / Eichberg-Film, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Anna May Wong (1905-1961) was the first Chinese American movie star, and the first Asian American actress to gain international recognition. Frustrated by the stereotypical supporting roles she reluctantly played in Hollywood, Wong left for Europe, where she starred in such classics as Piccadilly (1929).

Greta Garbo
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4526/1, 1929-1930. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Swedish Greta Garbo (1905-1990) is often regarded as one of the greatest and most glamorous movie stars ever produced by the Hollywood studio system. She was part of the Golden Age of the silent film of the 1920s and was one of the few actors who made a glorious transition to the talkies. She started her career in the European cinema and would always stay more popular in Europe than in the USA.

Jenny Jugo
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4536/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Pretty Austrian actress Jenny Jugo (1904-2001) had a prolific career in German cinema, from the late silent era well into the war years. She did particularly well as comedienne and starred between 1931 and 1942 in eleven smart and charming comedies directed by Erich Engel.

Truus van Aalten
German postcard by Ross Verlag, Berlin, no. 4549/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Alex Binder, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Dutch film star Truus van Aalten (1910-1999) made 29 films in the 1920s and 1930s, and only one of them in the Netherlands.

Olga Tschechowa
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, Berlin, no. 4592/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Defina. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Dignified German-Russian actress Olga Tschechova (1897-1980) was one of the most popular stars of the silent film era. She remained a mysterious person throughout her life.

Harold Lloyd and Ann Christy in Speedy (1928)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4607/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Paramount. Harold Lloyd and Ann Christy in Speedy (Ted Wilde, 1928). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

American actor, comedian, director, producer, screenwriter, and stunt performer Harold Lloyd (1893-1971) is best known for his silent comedies. He ranks alongside Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton as one of the three most popular and influential comedians of the silent film. Between 1914 and 1947, Lloyd made nearly 200 comedies, often as a bespectacled 'Glass' character, a resourceful, success-seeking go-getter who was perfectly in tune with 1920s-era United States. His films frequently contained 'thrill sequences' of extended chase scenes and daredevil physical feats. A classic is Lloyd hanging from the hands of a clock high above the street in Safety Last! (1923).

Vilma Banky in The Awakening (1929)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4637/2, 1929-1930. Photo: United Artists. Vilma Banky in The Awakening (Victor Fleming, 1929). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Hungarian-born silent film star Vilma Bánky (1898-1991) filmed in Budapest, France, Austria, and Germany, before Sam Goldwyn took her to Hollywood. There she starred opposite great silent stars like Rudolph Valentino and Ronald Colman. She became Goldwyn's biggest money maker till sound finished her career.

Lee Parry
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4646/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Balàzs, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lee Parry (1901-1977) was a German film actress of the silent and the early sound era, often in films by her husband Richard Eichberg. She appeared in 48 films between 1919 and 1939.

Clara Bow
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. 4672/3, 1928-1929. Photo: Paramount. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

American actress Clara Bow (1905-1965) rose to stardom in silent film during the 1920s. It was her appearance as a plucky shopgirl in the film It (Clarence G. Badger, 1927) that brought her global fame and the nickname 'The It Girl'. Bow came to personify the Roaring Twenties and is described as its leading sex symbol.

Norma Shearer
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4710/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

American actress Norma Shearer (1902-1983) was the 'First Lady of MGM'.

Lilian Harvey
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4740/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lilian Harvey
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4740/3, 1929-1930. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

British born, German actress and singer Lilian Harvey (1906-1968) was Ufa's biggest star of the 1930s. With Willy Fritsch she formed the 'Dream Team of the European Cinema'. Their best film was the immensely popular film operetta Der Kongress tanzt/The Congress Dances (Erik Charell, 1931).

Evelyn Holt
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4769/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Balázs, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Evelyn Holt (1908-2001) was a highly popular German film actress in the late silent and the early sound era. The rise of the Nazis finished her blossoming film career.

Charlie Chaplin
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4784/1, 1929-1930. Photo: United Artists. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

English comedian Charles ‘Charlie’ Chaplin (1889-1977) was one of the most creative and influential personalities of the silent-film era. His most famous role was that of The Tramp with his toothbrush moustache, undersized bowler hat and bamboo cane who struggled to survive while keeping his dignity in a world with great social injustice. Chaplin used mime, slapstick and other visual comedy routines, and he not only starred in his films, but also directed, wrote and produced them, and composed the music as well.

Tom Mix
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4813/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Radio Pictures Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

American film actor Tom Mix (1880–1940) was the star of many early Westerns between 1909 and 1935. Mix appeared in 291 films, all but nine of which were silent movies. He was Hollywood's first Western megastar and helped to define the genre for all cowboy actors who followed.

Fy og Bi in Alf's Carpet (1929)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4822/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Deutsche Lichtspiel-Syndikat (DLS). Fy og Bi in Alf's Carpet/The Rocket Bus (W.P. Kellino, 1929). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

The Danish double-act Fy og Bi (Fyrtårnet og Bivognen a.k.a. Pat & Patachon) was the most famous comedy couple of the European silent cinema. Long Carl Schenstrom (1881-1942) and short Harald Madsen (1890-1949) became very popular in the 1920s with their short slapstick films.

Ivan Petrovich and Alice Terry in The Three Passions (1928)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4854/1, 1929-1930. Photo: United Artists. Ivan Petrovich and Alice Terry in The Three Passions (Rex Ingram, 1928). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Hungarian actor Iván Petrovich (1894-1962) started his career with silent Hungarian films and appeared till his death in nearly 100 European films.

Lilian Harvey
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5117/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

British born, German actress and singer Lilian Harvey (1906-1968) was Ufa's biggest star of the 1930s. With Willy Fritsch she formed the 'Dream Team of the European Cinema'. Their best film was the immensely popular film operetta Der Kongress tanzt/The Congress Dances (Erik Charell, 1931).

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5192/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Atelier Gerstenberg, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Dutch actress Lien Deyers (1910-1965) - also known as Lien Deijers and Lien Dyers - was discovered by famous director Fritz Lang who gave her a part in Spione/Spies (1928). She acted in a stream of late silent and early sound films. After 1935 her star faded rapidly and her life ended in tragedy.

Greta Garbo and Lew Ayres in The Kiss (1929)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5347/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer. Greta Garbo and Lew Ayres in The Kiss (Jacques Feyder, 1929). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Swedish Greta Garbo (1905-1990) is often regarded as one of the greatest and most glamorous movie stars ever produced by the Hollywood studio system. She was part of the Golden Age of the silent film of the 1920s and was one of the few actors who made a glorious transition to the talkies. She started her career in the European cinema and would always stay more popular in Europe than in the USA.

James Hall and Jeanette MacDonald in Let's Go Native (1930)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5590/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Paramount. James Hall and Jeanette MacDonald in Let's Go Native (Leo McCarey, 1930). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Red-headed and blue-green eyed operatic singer Jeanette MacDonald (1903-1965) was discovered for the cinema by Ernst Lubitsch, who cast her opposite Maurice Chevalier in The Love Parade (1929). Later 'the Iron Butterfly' co-starred with Nelson Eddy in a string of successful musicals and played opposite Clark Gable in San Francisco (1936).

EFSP thanks Egbert Barten, Kathinka Dittrich and the late Mrs. Rietje Smith-Van Eekeren.

25 August 2019

New acquisitions at G.D.I.: a gift from Kathinka Dittrich, Part 1

Yesterday, EFSP had a post on a collection of postcards which Egbert Barten of the Geoffrey Donaldson Institute (G.D.I.) recently acquired. G.D.I. also received another, much older album from German film historian and author Kathinka Dittrich. Between 1981 and 1986, she was director of the Goethe Institute in Amsterdam and gained fame through the 'Berlin-Amsterdam 1920-1940 - Interactions' project. In 1987, she became a doctor of letters at the University of Amsterdam with her dissertation 'Achter het Doek' (Behind the Screen), about German emigrants in the Dutch cinema during the 1930s. Around that time, a lady from Amsterdam gave her this album. In the album, a little card reveals the name of the original owner, Mrs. Rietje Smith-Van Eekeren. The album contains film star postcards which the young Rietje probably collected around 1930, and it contains several hand-coloured and quite rare cards. For today's post we did a selection of the black and white and sepia postcards. Tomorrow follows a post with the hand-coloured cards.

Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery in Untamed (1929)
French postcard by Cinémagazine-Edition, Paris, no. 663. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery in Untamed (Jack Conway, 1929). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy
Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. French postcard by Cinémagazine-Edition, Paris, no. 674. Photo: Goldwyn Mayer (MGM). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

John Gilbert
John Gilbert. Austrian postcard by Iris Verlag, no. 428/2. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn Pictures. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Betty Bronson in A Kiss for Cinderella (1925)
Austrian postcard by Iris-Verlag, no. 504. Photo: Fanamet-Film. Betty Bronson in A Kiss for Cinderella (Herbert Brenon, 1925). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Andrée Lafayette
Andrée Lafayette. Austrian postcard by Iris Verlag, no. 5641. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Marion Gerth
Marion Gerth. Austrian postcard by Iris Verlag, no. 5814. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Marceline Day
Marceline Day. Austrian postcard by Iris Verlag, no. 5486. Photo: Fox. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Betty Bronson
Betty Bronson. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 1701/1, 1927-1928. Photo: Fanamet. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Pat & Patachon
Pat & Patachon (Fy og Bi). German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4453/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Lothar Stark-Film. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Marie Prevost
Marie Prevost. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4467/1, 1929-1930. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Dolores Costello
Dolores Costello. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4478/1, 1929-1930. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Bessie Love
Bessie Love. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4516/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Maly Delschaft
Maly Delschaft. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4623/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Badekow, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Leni Riefenstahl
Leni Riefenstahl. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4660/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Kiesel. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Clara Bow
Clara Bow. German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. 4672/4, 1928-1929. Photo: Paramount.

Davey Lee
Davey Lee. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4733/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Defina / First National. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lilian Harvey
Lilian Harvey. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4884/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Mary Brian
Mary Brian. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5147/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Paramount. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Davey Lee
Davey Lee. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5184/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Warner Bros. / National. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

William Haines in Way Out West (1930)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5350/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. William Haines in Way Out West (Fred Niblo, 1930). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich. German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5582/3, 1930-1931. Photo: Paramount. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Marlene Dietrich in Dishonored (1931)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5964/3, 1930-1931. Photo: Paramount. Marlene Dietrich in Dishonored/Agent X27 (Josef von Sternberg, 1931). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Robert Coogan in Sooky (1931)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5992/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Paramount. Robert Coogan in Sooky (Norman Taurog, 1931). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Barbara Kent and Harold Lloyd in Feet First (1930)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6715/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Paramount. Barbara Kent and Harold Lloyd in Feet First (Clyde Bruckman, 1930). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and John Barrymore in Grand Hotel (1932)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 160/4. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and John Barrymore in Grand Hotel (Edmund Goulding, 1932). Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Nancy Carroll
Nancy Carroll. British postcard in the Picturegoer Series, London, no. 400. Sent by mail from The Netherlands to Berlgium in 1930. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Source: Wikipedia (Dutch). And many thanks to Egbert Barten, Kathinka Dittrich and the late Mrs. Rietje Smith-Van Eekeren.