25 January 2022

32 times Ava!

Today, it's exactly 32 years ago that Ava Gardner (1922-1990) passed away. She was considered one of the most beautiful women of her day. In 1941, 19-years-old Ava signed a contract with MGM. After her screen test, the director had clapped his hands gleefully and yelled, "She can't talk! She can't act! She's sensational!" Ava appeared in small roles and on pin-up photos until she drew everybody's attention in The Killers (1946). She became one of Hollywood's most glamorous stars but was also nominated for the Oscar for Best Actress for Mogambo (1953). From then till the 1970s, she appeared in several high-profile films, both in Hollywood and Europe. On 25 January 1990 she died at the age of 67.

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard by Bromofoto, Milano, no. 224.

Ava Gardner
Dutch postcard, no. 3265. Photo: Universal International.

Ava Gardner
Spanish postcard, no. 261.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by Editions P.I., no. 13D. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1953.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by Editions P.I., Paris, no. 424. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Ava Gardner
Spanish collectors card, no. 3868.

Ava Gardner
British Greetings card, no. D. Photo: Virgil Apger / Metro Goldwyn Mayer.

Ava Gardner
British postcard in the Picturegoer Series, London, no. D 77. Photo: Metro Goldwyn Mayer.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by Editions P.I., La Garenne-Colombes, no. 208, 1950. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Ava Gardner
Vintage autograph card.

Ava Gardner in Pandora and The Flying Dutchman
German postcard. Photo: Universal International Pictures. Ava Gardner in One Touch of Venus (William A. Seiter, 1948).

Ava Gardner
Belgian collectors card by Kwatta, Bois d'Haine, no. C 234. Photo: M.G.M. Publicity still for East Side, West Side (Mervyn LeRoy, 1949).

Ava Gardner
Dutch postcard.

Ava Gardner
French postcard, no. 116. Photo: Virgil Apger.

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard by B.F.F. (Casa Edit. Ballerini & Fratini), Milano, no. 2659. Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Publicity still for Show Boat (George Sidney, 1951).

Ava Gardner and Gregory Peck in The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952)
West-German postcard by Rüdel-Verlag, Hamburg-Bergedorf, no. 507. Photo: 20th Century Fox. Ava Gardner and Gregory Peck in The Snows of Kilimanjaro (Henry King, 1952).

Robert Taylor and Ava Gardner in Knights of the Round Table (1953)
Yugoslavian postcard by Sedma Sila. Photo: IOM, Beograd. Robert Taylor and Ava Gardner in Knights of the Round Table (Richard Thorpe, 1953).

Robert Taylor and Ava Gardner in Knights of the Round Table (1953)
Spanish postcard by Celuloide Stars. Robert Taylor and Ava Gardner in Knights of the Round Table (Richard Thorpe, 1953).

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard by Bromofoto, Milano, no. 881. Photo: Dear Film. Publicity still for The Barefoot Contessa (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954).

Ava Gardner
Vintage collectors card. Photo: MGM. Publicity still for The Barefoot Contessa (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954).

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard by Rotalcolor, Milano, no. 124.

Ava Gardner
American postcard by Silvercraft, West Nyack (N.Y.). Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Publicity still for Bhowani Junction (George Cukor, 1956).

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard. Photo: DEAR Film.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by Editions P.I., Paris, offered by Les Carbones Korès 'Carboplane, no. 885. Photo: 20th Century Fox.

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard in the series Artisti di Sempre by Rotalfoto, Milano, no. 299.

Ava Gardner
Small Spanish postcard by La Revista Florita, no. 6.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by E.D.U.G., no. 48.

Ava Gardner
Italian postcard by Rotalcolor (Rotalfoto), Milano (Milan), no. 13.

Ava Gardner
Vintage Postcard.

Ava Gardner
German postcard by ISV, no. D 4. Photo: Civiani.

Ava Gardner
French postcard by E.D.U.G., no. 126.

Oleg Popov (1930-2016)
Russian postcard. Photo: Oleg Popov, Ava Gardner, and Todd Lookinland in The Blue Bird (George Cukor, 1976).

24 January 2022

Nos Artistes

The French love their stage performers and in the early 20th Century, the magazine Comoedia published several postcard series with portraits in sepia. In the past, EFSP already did some posts on the 'Nos Artistes dans leur loge' series with French actors and actresses photographed in their dressing rooms. Next week, we will do a post on another series, called 'Nos Artistes dans leurs expressions', translated: Our Artists in their expression. Today we focus on a lesser-known series, simply called 'Nos Artistes'.

Maxa


(Paula) Maxa
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 28. Photo: Comoedia.

French stage and screen actress Maxa aka Paula Maxa (1898-1970), was nicknamed "the most murdered woman in the world". Mademoiselle Maxa debuted on screen as Laure, the maid of Moréno in Louis Feuillade's crime serial Les vampires (1915-1916). She then played in four French silent films: L'ibis bleu (Camille de Morlhon, 1918), Les chères images (André Hugon, 1920), in which she had the female lead opposite Jean Angelo, La révoltée (Gaston Leprieur, 1920), and finally, Hugon's Fille de rien (André Hugon, 1921). IMDb notes in its Trivia section: "The directors of her time appreciated her excessive gestures, her screams of terror (obviously mute), which accompanied two expressive and watery bulging eyes in their excellent simulation of panic and the hysteria of being killed. For these qualities, she was chosen to be killed in films up to 350 times [this could be contested, as she only appeared in a handful of films]. But in her true career, the theatre, she died on stage up to 30,000 times. A record." Indeed, between 1917 and 1933, Maxa specialised in victims in Grand Guignol plays. Maxa's main stage partner at the Grand Guignol was Georges Paulais. She sometimes left her favourite roles for less bloody productions, boulevard comedies, and some film roles. In 2018 a Belgian Netflix film was made about her, La femme la plus assassinée du monde/The Most Assassinated Woman in the World (Frank Ribière, 2018), staring Anna Mouglalis.

Rahna


(Marcelle) Rahna
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 29. Photo: Comoedia.

Marcelle Rahna aka Rahna and La jolie Rahna, was a French revue dancer, singer and actress in the 1920s. In 1923, she performed at the Palace Theatre in Paris with dancer Harry Pilcer in 'L'après-midi d'un Faune', based on the music by Claude Debussy. The year after, she performed with Pilcer, Polaire and Peggy Vere at the Palace in the revue 'Toutes les femmes'. In 1924 she also debuted in cinema, as la Camargo in the seven episodes of the serial Mandrin (Henri Fescourt, 1924), starring Romuald Joubé and produced by Société des Cinéromans. She played a dancer in La Clé de voûte (Roger Lion, 1925) and again as a dancer in Le P'tit Parigot (René Le Somptier, 1926). In 1930 Rahna sang in the revue 'Nudist'bar' (the French version of the Austrian revue 'Die Wunder-Bar). The last time Marcelle Rahna appeared on the screen was in the documentary Montmartre, village d'amour (1932).

Pierre Magnier


Pierre Magnier
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 30. Photo: Comoedia.

Pierre Magnier (1869-1959) was a French stage and screen actor and director, acting in over 100 films and known for La roue (Abel Gance, 1923), Cyrano de Bergerac (Augusto Genina, 1923) and La règle du jeu (Jean Renoir, 1939). In 1900 he debuted on-screen in Hamlet's Duel, a short dialogue between Hamlet and Laertes, with Sarah Bernhardt playing Hamlet. With Bernhardt, Magnier also acted in the plays 'Théodora' (1902) and 'Théroigne de Méricourt' (1902) at Bernhardt's own theater. In 1906-1908, Magnier worked with Bernhardt's rival Réjane. In 1909, Magnier started a more substantial career as a film actor in 1909 at Pathé Frères, debuting in La Maison sans enfant (Georges Monca, 1909). He had the male lead in L'ambitieuse (Camille deMorlhon, 1912), the first of a whole string of films with de Morlhon, such as L'usurier (1913), La reine Margot (1914), and La marchande de fleurs (1915), often opposite Léontine Massart. After a few more Pathé films, including L'ibis bleu (Camille deMorlhon, 1919) with Paule Maxa, he moved to Eclipse and appeared with Suzanne Grandais in Le siège des trois K (Jacques de Baroncelli, 1919). Memorable was his - supporting - part as Jacques de Hersan in La roue (Abel Gance, 1922), starring Séverin-Mars. Magnier had the male lead in Cirano di Bergerac/Cyrano de Bergerac (Augusto Genina, 1923), with Linda Moglia as Roxanne, and Angelo Ferrari as Christian. After a few more silent films, Magnier quit film acting and only returned in 1930, when the sound film had set in. From then on, he mainly focused on film acting, less on stage acting. By now, he had become the 'older man' in film plots, e.g. playing Metternich in Le congrès s'amuse (Jean Boyer, Erik Charell, 1931). He acted in many comedies, e.g. with Fernandel. In 1939 he played a general in La règle du jeu/The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939). During the 1940s and early 1950s, Magnier kept acting in minor parts.

Maxime Léry


Maxime Léry
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 31. Photo: Comoedia.

Maxime Léry (1884–1966) was a French stage and screen actor, and also a playwright. In 1913 he made his film debut at Pathé Frères as the leading actor in Le fils de Lagardère/The Heir of the Lagarderes (Henri Andréani, 1913), based on the eponymous novel by Paul Faval. After that, he only did a handful of scarce and minor parts in French silent and sound cinema.

Georges Milton


Georges Milton
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 33. Photo: Comoedia.

With his daring, merry songs, French singer and actor Georges Milton (1886-1970) expressed the atmosphere of the French roaring twenties. He peaked in the French cinema of the 1930s as the character Bouboule. On the advice of Maurice Chevalier, he did singing tours, which earned him immediate success, becoming one of the headliners of the main Parisian café concerts. He also played small parts in four silent films by Henri Diamant-Berger in 1923, all with Maurice Chevalier in the lead. After a revue at La Cigale, Milton turned to operetta. The huge success of the songs 'La Fille du bédouin' and 'Artichauts' from the operetta 'Comte Obligado!' (1927) propelled Milton to stardom. The arrival of sound cinema created a new career for Georges Milton. He created the character of ‘Bouboule’, a French middle-class Joe, who became the optimistic and joyful hero of a series of films. In the film adaptation Le Comte Obligado (André Mathot, 1934), Milton perfectly incorporated the ‘petit Parisien’, enormously dynamic, despite his lack of size and classic beauty. With its air of ‘average Frenchman’, he acted at least in one film a year in the 1930s. Milton retired after the war.

Georges Paulais


Georges Paulais
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series by Edit. Art de Comoedia, no. 34. Photo: Comoedia. As Paulais' first stage name was Georges, the signature on this card looks odd.

French actor Kléber Paulais (1884-1967) was known as Georges Paulais. After a successful career in the theatre, where he was the favourite interpreter of André de Lorde's dramas at the Grand-Guignol, the cinema called upon Georges Paulais and his deep bass voice from the beginning of the talking era. His impressive filmography is made up largely of modest, notable appearances, and spans from 1910 to 1968. In 1910-1911 he debuted at Pathé Frères where he played in dozens of shorts, directed by Albert Capellani, Georges Denola, and others. Afterward, he acted at Eclair in 1912, and again in 1914. In the later 1910s and 1920s, he had major supporting parts in Le droit de la vie (Abel Gance, 1917), Eldorado (Marcel L'Herbier, 1921), the serial Belphegor (Henri Desfontaines, 1927), and La merveilleuse vie de Jeanne d'Arc (Marco de Gastyne, 1929). In the sound era, Paulais had major parts in Accusée... levez-vous! (Maurice Tourneur, 1930) starring Gaby Morlay, Coeur de lilas (Anatole Litvak, 1932), La porteuse de pain (René Sti, 1934) starring Germaine Dermoz, and Rigolboche (Christian-Jaque, 1936) with Mistinguett, often playing lawyers and judges. Paulais had a steady, continuous career in French cinema till the early 1950s. His last part was in René Clément's Gervaise (1956).

Other Nos Artistes series


Polin


Polin, Nos Artistes
French postcard in the series Nos Artistes, no. 251. Picture: J. Bertin.

French comedian Polin (1863-1927) was one of the greatest stars of the café-concerts of Paris. His interpretations were sober and had nuance and finesse, which were rare in the café-concerts. From 1910 on, he also appeared in film and theatre, including Sacha Guitry's play Le Grand Duc/The Grand Duke (1921) with Lucien and Sacha Guitry, and Yvonne Printemps.

Gilberte Savary


Gilberte Savary
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series. Caption: Jeune Vedette des Films Parlants (Young star of the sound cinema).

French child actress Gilberte Savary (1921-1992) appeared in six films between 1928 and 1934. She made her film debut as a little girl in the silent film La faute de Monique/Monique’s fault (Maurice Gleize, 1928), with Sandra Milovanoff and Rudolf Klein Rogge. The following year, she had a small part in the Alexandre Dumas adaptation Le collier de la reine/The Queen's Necklace (Tony Lekain, Gaston Ravel, 1929) starring Marcelle Chantal and Diana Karenne. She had one of the leading roles in the circus drama La ronde des heures/Round of Hours (Alexandre Ryder, 1931) as the daughter of clown André Baugé. The success of the film made her a child star and in 1931, she appeared in a total of four films. One was a bit role in Tout ça ne vaut pas l'amour/All that is not worth the love (Jacques Tourneur, 1931) with Marcel Lévesque and the young Jean Gabin both falling in love with Josselyne Gael. In 1923, director Jacques de Baroncelli had made the fairy tale-like Le rêve/The Dream (1923), a silent film version of the sixteenth volume in Emile Zola's Rougon-Macquart saga. In 1931 he made a sound version, Le rêve/The Dream (1931), now with Savary as a lost child who is adopted by a humble family. When she has grown up, the girl (now played by Simone Genevois) falls in love with the bishop's son (Jaque Catelain), and the old man who plans a beau marriage is not prepared to accept it. Finally in her last film appearance, Savary played the young Eponine Thénardier in the epic Les Miserables (Raymond Bernard, 1934) starring Harry Baur as ex-convict Jean Valjean and Charles Vanel as the obsessive police inspector Javert. Now an adolescent, Gilberte retired from the screen.

Lucienne Waldor


Lucienne Waldor in Les gars de la Marine
French postcard in the Nos Artistes series. Lucienne Waldor in Les gars de la Marine. Caption: the youngest star in the world, Lucienne Waldor, aged 2, in the role of Captain Craddock, singing Les gars de Marine. The -r has been forgotten on this card.

In 1933 Lucienne Waldor aka Lulu, real name Lucienne Sangan, born Lambec, was promoted as the French Shirley Temple. With her parents Lucien Waldor and his wife, her elder brother Jackie Waldor and other family members (brothers Lucky and Robert and cousin Jackson), she performed as the 'Troupe Waldor", e.g. as live intermezzo in cinemas, singing, dancing, and playing instruments, and touring all of France. Apparently, they were so popular that a boy was knocked over by a car when running out to see the family passing. Lucienne Waldor's life was haunted by car accidents. In 1937 the family had a bad car accident when returning from St. Dizier to Paris a tire exploded and the car crashed into a tree. Particularly the parents were gravely hurt. On 20 September 2019, at age 88, Lucienne Waldor was killed herself by a truck when crossing a zebra in front of the train station of St. Raphael, in a zone where trucks without special permits were forbidden.

Sources: Wikipedia (French) and IMDb.

23 January 2022

The Incredibles (2004)

In our sixth and for now the last post on Pixar, we focus on the superhero film The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). This American computer-animated film was the sixth feature produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Set in a fictitious version of the 1960s, the film follows Bob and Helen Parr, a couple of superheroes, known as Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl, who hide their powers in accordance with a government mandate and attempt to live a quiet suburban life with their three children. Bob's desire to help people draws the entire family into a confrontation with a vengeful fan-turned-foe. Although the film was not as successful as its predecessor Finding Nemo (2003), it still received 27 awards and the film's DVD was the best-selling DVD of 2005, selling 17.4 million copies.

The Incredibles (2004)
Belgian postcard by Boomerang. Image: Disney / Pixar. The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Now on DVD!

Artwork for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Art by Robert McGinnis for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Film image of The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Korean poster for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Korean poster for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Artwork for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Art by Paul Topolos for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

The Incredibles (2004)
Belgian postcard by Boomerang promoting the DVD of the film. Image: Disney / Pixar. Jack-Jack in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004).

Ex-superheroes


The story of The Incredibles begins with a still young Mr. Incredible a.k.a. Bob Parr who, like any superhero, performs his daily heroic deeds. He is unexpectedly visited by Buddy, a young fan eager to become his helper. Buddy turns out to be more of a nuisance than a help, despite his self-invented gadgets, and Mr. Incredible sends him away.

Later that day, he marries the superheroine Elastigirl (Helen). Then, suddenly, things go wrong. After Mr. Incredible saves a man who was about to commit suicide, the man sues him. This leads to a chain reaction of lawsuits against superheroes. The government decides to help the superheroes by setting up a special programme that will pay for all their lawsuits and provide them with new identities, on the condition that they never do heroic work again.

15 years later, Bob and Helen have settled into a quiet little town. They now have three children: teenage Violet, 10-year-old Dashiell ("Dash"), and baby Jack-Jack. Violet and Dash each have superpowers, but Jack-Jack is apparently normal. Bob, who now works at an insurance company, is frustrated that he can't help anyone anymore. He still tries to be a "hero" by pointing out loopholes in the law to his clients so they can get their benefits. He also regularly goes out at night with his old friend Lucius (also an ex-superhero called Frozone) to help people.

He is unknowingly shadowed by Mirage, a mysterious woman. After Bob loses his job, Mirage contacts him. She offers him a large sum of money if Bob will take out a runaway robot, the Omnidroid 9000, on an island. Bob accepts the job and defeats the Omnidroid. After this, Bob gets more and more assignments. He starts training again to get in shape and has the fashion designer Edna Mode make him a new suit.

Two months later, Mirage calls Bob again. When Bob arrives on the same island again, he is attacked by an enhanced version of the Omnidroid. He is captured by the mastermind behind the Omnidroid, a man called Syndrome. This Syndrome is none other than his old fan Buddy. He has made a fortune over the past 15 years inventing and selling weapons. He has kept the best weapons in order to become a hero, despite his lack of superpowers.

Later, when Mr. Incredible escapes and looks into Syndrome's computer, he is horrified to discover that Syndrome has already killed dozens of superheroes to prepare his Omnidroid for battle with Mr. Incredible. At home, Helen discovers Bob's absence. When she sees that his old superhero suit has been repaired, she immediately goes to Edna.

Edna shows the superhero costumes that she has made for all the members of the family. From Edna, she hears that Bob was fired months ago and has started working as a superhero again. Thanks to a transmitter Edna fitted into Bob's suit, Helen discovers Bob's location and immediately jets off to the island. Dash and Violet come along as stowaways. Unfortunately for Mr. Incredible, the transmitter also gives his location away to Syndrome and he is captured again.

The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Film image of The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Artwork for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. End credit art by Teddy Newton for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Artwork for The Incredibles (2004)
End credit art by Teddy NewtonAmerican postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Film image of The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Concept art for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Concept art by Lou Romano for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

Concept art for The Incredibles (2004)
American postcard by Disney Enterprises / Pixar Animation Studios, 2005. Image: Pixar Animation Studios. Concept art by Lou Romano for The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). From 'The Art of Pixar: 100 Collectible Postcards, published by Chronicle Books.

The Incredibles (2004)
Belgian postcard by Boomerang. Image: Disney / Pixar. The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Now on DVD!

Alternating breakneck action with satire of suburban sitcom life


Brad Bird originally conceived the screenplay for The Incredibles for a traditional, animated film for Warner Bros. According to his own account, he got the idea from a drawing he had made in 1993. He developed the film as an extension of the 1960s comic books and spy films from his boyhood and personal family life. After the film Looney Tunes: Back in Action (Joe Dante, Eric Goldberg, 2003) became a flop, Warner Bros. closed its animated film division, and the project for The Incredibles was cancelled.

When Bird later talked to his friend John Lasseter about the film, Lasseter convinced him to give Pixar a try. Bird and Lasseter knew each other from their college years at CalArts in the 1970s. Pixar accepted Bird's script but changed the animation to computer animation. This made it the first Pixar film to feature only human characters.

At his request, Bird was allowed to put together his own crew. He approached people he had worked with on The Iron Giant (Brad Bird, 1999), among others. Bird's idea contained many scenes that were difficult for computer animation to do. Among other things, new techniques were needed to realistically depict human anatomy, clothing, and skin. Among other things, Violet's long hair was technically difficult to draw. The film was largely treated as if it were a live-action production.

John Barry was the first choice for the composer because of his music for the trailer of the James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service (Peter R. Hunt, 1969). However, Barry did not want to recreate his old soundtracks for the film, so Michael Giacchino was approached. The music in the film is entirely instrumental.

Critics' reactions were very positive. Critic Roger Ebert awarded the film 3.5 out of 4 stars and wrote: "The Pixar Studios, which cannot seem to take a wrong step, steps right again with "The Incredibles," a superhero spoof that alternates breakneck action with satire of suburban sitcom life. After the "Toy Story" movies, "A Bug's Life," "Monsters, Inc." and "Finding Nemo," here's another example of Pixar's mastery of popular animation."

The film is generally regarded as one of the best Pixar films. One point that many critics noticed was that the film had a much more serious and mature undertone than previous Pixar films. However, this was also a point of negative criticism. The film clearly contained more and more realistic violence than previous Pixar films.

The film won the Academy Award in 2005 for the Best Animated Film (the second Pixar film to win this award) and the award for best sound effects. The film was also nominated for the award for best screenplay and best sound. The Incredibles made $70,467,623 in its opening week, more than any Pixar film has ever made in its opening week. The film even (just) beat Finding Nemo's revenue of $70,251,710. The film brought in a total of $261,441,092, making it the second most successful Pixar film ever, and the fifth most successful film of 2004. Worldwide revenue was $631,436,092. A sequel, Incredibles 2, was released in 2018.

Bob Parr, Mr. Incredible in The Incredibles (2004), 15,
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 678. Image: Disney / Pixar. Bob Parr, Mr. Incredible in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Mr. Incredible. HT: 2.0m. WT: 158 kg. Powers: Strength & Agility. Fifteen years (and fifty pounds) after he hung up his hero suit, Mr. Incredible, once the best-known most popular super alive, has gone underground and is living as Bob Parr, a claims adjuster at possibly the world's worst insurance company, Insuricare. Though Bob's preoccupation with bygone days has taken a toll on him and his family, he's surprised to learn that his greatest adventures lay ahead.

Helen Parr, Elastigal in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 679. Image: Disney / Pixar. Helen Parr, Elastigal in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Elastigal. HT: 1.73 m. WT: 56.7 kg. Powers: Flexibility & Stretching. Helen Parr, Bob's wife, has adjusted to normal life quite well and is busily focused on caring for her three children. While she occasionally uses her amazing stretching ability to meet the daily challenges of motherhood, she is careful to do so only behind the closed doors of their suburban home. She misses the old days but doesn't dwell on them. She only wishes that Bob would do the same.

Dashiell 'Dash' Parr in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 680. Image: Disney / Pixar. Dash in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Dash. HT: 1.22 m. WT: 29.5 kg. Powers: Super speed & Superior Reaction Time. Like most ten-year-old boys, Dash seems to be moving even when standing still. Full of restless energy, he has the power of super speed, a power so useful for playing pranks on his least favourite teacher that he has difficulty keeping it in check. Dash has been called into the principal's office more than once, but he's never been caught. Dash doesn't understand why his family should hide their powers - why would they have them if they weren't supposed to use them?

Violet Parr in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 681. Image: Disney / Pixar. Violet in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Violet. HT: 1.37m. WT: 158kg [sic]. Powers: Invisibility & Forcefield. Violet Parr is, in most ways, a typical shy, insecure teenage girl stuck at the crossroads between child and woman. She, like her superhero parents, possesses special powers. It seems only right that hers allow her to disappear from view and her problems, at a moment's notice - especially for someone who desperately wants to be like everybody else, but isn't.

Jack-Jack Parr in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 682. Image: Disney / Pixar. Jack-Jack in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Jack-Jack. HT: 0.76m. WT: 11.3kg. Powers: unknown. Jack-Jack is the little black sheep of the family. The most unusual thing about him is how there is nothing unusual about him. But who knows? Like all babies, he has 'incredible' potential.

Lucius Best, Frozone in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 683. Image: Disney / Pixar. Lucius Best, Frozone in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Frozone. HT: 1.88m. WT: 81.6kg. Powers: Freezing Ability. Lucius Best used to be known as Frozone - the coolest Super of them all. His style, wit, and ability to create ice from moisture in the air (not to mention his special multi-function boots) made him the envy of every gadget-loving little boy. The best friend of Mr. Incredible. Lucius knows the old days are done and doesn't try to relive the past. But he knows Bob still wants to and tries to help him chill out in any way he can.

Edna 'E' Mode in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 684 Image: Disney / Pixar. Edna 'E' Mode in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Edna Mode. Ht: 1.12 m. Wt: Not telling, Dahling! Powers: Fashion Genious, Dahling! Though she first gained notoriety as the world's leading superhero costume designer, Edna Mode (known as E) remains a leading figure in international fashion. Still at the top of her game, E is bored with vapid, "brainless" supermodels, finding it particularly galling as she "used to design for Gods." She longs for the return of the Supers, for a real design challenge, for one more chance to fuse the latest technology with her impeccable fashion sense.

Buddy Pine a.k.a. Syndrome in The Incredibles (2004)
British postcard by Arcard Cards promoting Toshiba's Qosmio AV Notebook PC, no. 685 Image: Disney / Pixar. Buddy Pine a.k.a. Syndrome in The Incredibles (Brad Bird, 2004). Caption: Syndrome. Ht: 1.85 m. Wt: 83.9 kg Powers: Unlimited Budget. Highly intelligent and cunning, Syndrome spends his days on Nomanison Island, a remote paradise on the far side of the world. An accomplished inventor, Syndrome is torn between admiration and resentment towards the Supers.

Sources: Roger Ebert (RogerEbert.com), Wikipedia (Dutch and English), and IMDb.